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Extraordinary Exoplanets with Emily Deibert

Over 4000 exoplanets have been discovered to date—but what do we really know about them, and how do we know it?

The Sky This Month for June 17 - July 15, 2020
As part of the Recreational Astronomy Night online meeting of June 17, 2020, Arnold Brody presents the celestial highlights for the upcoming month.

This PDF contains the content of Arnold Brody's The Sky This Month presentation delivered during the online Recreational Astronomy Night meeting on June 17, 2020.

Star Light, Star Bright with Dr. Rachel Ward-Maxwell
Saturday, July 11, 2020 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Ever wonder what that bright object is in the night sky? From dying stars to shooting stars, there are many astronomical phenomena which have long inspired curiosity, fear, and awe.
Ontario Science Centre at Night
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm

Join us for our monthly recreational astronomy night meeting. This is where our members get to show their latest projects or give tutorials and tips on just about everything to do with astronomy.

Space Educators Institute Conference 2020
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 - 12:00pm to Friday, August 7, 2020 - 4:00pm

The Space Educators Institute is 3-day conference focused on providing training in space-themed resources for formal and informal educators from across Canada.

Cosmos From Your Couch

Looking for a way to connect with the wider world–or maybe the wider universe–during the pandemic? The Dunlap Institute and our partners from across the University of Toronto want to connect with you!

A Picture in 1000 Words

Ever wonder what’s going on in those beautiful pictures you see on the news from space?

The Insider's Guide to the Galaxy
Join us online to learn basic astronomy that you can do on your own from your backyard! We'll be hosting introductory astronomy courses on Tuesdays from 3:30-5:00pm EDT.
Explore the Universe
Join us online as we Explore the Universe together! We'll be hosting sessions every other Thursday from 3:30-4:30pm EDT.
Loony Moons - Christa Van Laerhoven

The collections of moons that orbit our giant planets are very like miniature planetary systems, each with their own dramatic history.

Ontario Science Centre at Night
Wednesday, June 17, 2020 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Watch the recorded video: https://youtu.be/ZXUvEsLpO3s
Astronomy Night at the DDO
Tonight's program has been postponed until August. Instead, we have devoted this time to provide space for and to amplify the voices of Black, Indigenous and other minority groups in science and astronomy. We've prepared a short video examining diversity in astronomy and how to support astronomers from these communities.
Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Toronto Centre affirms our commitment to increasing diversity and inclusion in our membership and public outreach services.
The Dance of Venus, the Moon and the Sun

On May 27, 2020, Ron Macnaughton presented a talk about the special interaction of Venus, the Moon and the Sun. Ron is a member of the RASC, Toronto Centre and was speaking at the online Recreational Astronomy Night meeting.

How to Share Observations and Photos

On May 27, 2020, Blake Nancarrow presented his ideas on why and how to share your astronomical observations and photos. He spoke at the online version of the monthly Recreational Astronomy Night meeting.

Weighing the Universe with a Balloon-Borne Telescope with Mohamed Shaaban
Not only is the Universe expanding, but it’s also accelerating! This revelation implies either our understanding of gravity is flawed or that a mysterious negative pressure known as Dark Energy is driving the expansion.
Truth at the Eyepiece

Since the advent of telescopic astronomy four centuries ago it's been a constant that visual records of observations should only show what is seen at the eyepiece, and no more.

A Short History of the David Dunlap Observatory

A short history of the David Dunlap Observatory located in Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada just outside the Toronto City border - Canada's largest optical telescope.

We Are All Made of Stardust with Dr. Parshati Patel
Believe it or not, most of the elements in our body are made of stardust. Iron in our blood, calcium in our teeth, oxygen in our body…all of that and more came from stars!
Canadian Women in Astronomy

A brief history of some of the important women actively involved in the advancement of amateur and professional astronomy and astrophysics in Canada over the last century.

Johannes Kepler

Jerry Vila, a Toronto Centre member, presents a brief history of the life and works of Johannes Kepler, an astronomer, mathematician, and astrologer who lived from 1571-1630.

30 Years of the Hubble Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope has provided amazing images of the universe from its location in Earth orbit for three decades.

Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth

"Is there intelligent life beyond Earth?" is a question that mankind has been asking for eternity.

Apollo 13, The Flight That Failed
Fifty years ago, the third mission was launched to land two people on the Moon. On the third day of the flight, a problem occurred which cancelled the plans for the lunar landing and instead, started a race to get the astronauts home alive.
Jellyfish I Have Known: The Aquatic and the Nebulous

Jenna Hinds, the Youth Outreach Coordinator at the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, gave a spirited presentation describing how she developed her interest in Astronomy and the varied route she took to get there.

Robotic Telescope Project: Information Session
Curious about what’s happening with the Robotic Telescope Project? Here is the recording of the webinar streamed live on Feb 19, 2020 discussing details of the project.
Now is Not the Time with Richard Bloch
We think of time as an ever-flowing phenomenon that brings us from the past to the future through the present. But over a century ago Einstein showed us that this is not the structure of time, and in the ensuing years it has become clear that time is very different from our familiar understanding.
Immersive Astronomy

Ron Macnaughton visited the Immersive Van Gogh exhibit in Montreal and was inspired to ask if its method of presenting Van Gogh's art could be used to capture the astronomical experience one would have under a clear, dark, luminous sky.

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